Building a Stronger Britain Together

One Voice Blackburn has been commissioned by the Home Office to deliver a ‘Kick Out Hate project.

The aim of the project is to equip the community with the knowledge and understanding to counter extremism, reduce hatred and increase tolerance, harmony and trust in the community we live in.

The project is for families with a South Asian background but also families from the non Asian Community and will focus on promoting shared values, creating a sense of belonging and understanding different faiths and beliefs enabling the community to interact and engage with each other without fear, apprehension and mistrust.

The project will provide a series of workshops with empahsis on countering extremism. The workshops will cater for 5 distinct groups, children from 6 to 14, a boys group for ages 15 to 18, a girls group for ages 15 to 18 and a women’s group and a men’s group.

The project will hope to engage over 100 people in these workshops and will ensure the discussions and material provided is age appropriate and relevant. The workshops will demonstrate the threats of radicalisation, terrorism and extremism which divide and destroy communities and will promote values that unite communities, show how we can challenge extremist narrative and ideology and how to deal with terrorism and hate crime which continue to plague our society.

The workshops will be complemented by a series of events bringing the community together and demonstrating shared values. The events will include a community cohesion project, an afternoon tea party, a cultural gathering where we will invite people from all faiths and backgrounds. At the end of the project we will compile a short video so that the project can leave a lasting legacy.

I’M NOT A MUSLIM BUT I WILL FAST FOR ONE DAY

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POLYGAMY & BIGAMY

As part of the Building a Stronger Britain Together project One voice held a number of workshops with women from a South Asian and Muslim background n the issue of polygamy and bigamy in their communities. The results provided an interesting conclusion.